Women in Research: Noelia Fernández from Argentina

Dec 12, 2019

Noelia from Argentina is a PhD student in the Weitz working group at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (formerly at Walter Schottky Institute (WSI/TUM))and a graduate member at the International Max Planck Research School for Quantum Sciences and Technology. In the frame of her PhD thesis, she performs experiments that combine femtosecond optics and on-chip electronics to generate electric pulses in the frequency range between classical electronics and photonics, so-called THz gap, where components for signal generation, conversion and detection have been historically difficult to implement. Her group’s work, exploring new horizons of applications for ultra-short pulsed lasers, aims at paving the way for realising ultrafast coherent on-chip electronics that will bridge the THz technology gap. 

Noelia Fernández presenting her poster during the Poster Flashes at #LINO19, Picture/Credit: Julia Nimke/Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings

Here is an excerpt from her interview:

What is the coolest project you have worked on and why?

I put my heart on every project I work on, so I find them all cool in their own way. There is for example my PhD project: I am working on experiments aimed at paving the way to produce ultrafast on-chip electronics with frequency components up to 10 THz (1 THz = 10^12 Hz). This implies covering the frequency range between classical electronics and photonics, the so-called THz gap, where components for signal generation, conversion and detection remain difficult to implement. To access this range, we use a combination of femtosecond optics and on-chip electronics to generate electric pulses in the THz domain. Working on this project I have the chance to develop different skills. In particular, I am excited about how much I learn from the laser I use, not only from the technical aspects of its operation, but also from the amazing non-linear phenomena generated by the ultra-short pulses it provides. Besides, to develop this project I work between two research groups: the one of my PhD advisor Alexander Holleitner and of his collaborator partner Reinhard Kienberger at TUM. This gives me the chance to interact with people with different backgrounds, which I personally find enriching.

Find her full interview on our blog. 


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